TeenLife Blog Supporting teen success, one post at a time
Posted Sept. 3, 2015, 8 a.m. by Susan Moeller | View Comments
computer science education

A recent study on schools and computer science demonstrates the gap between what parents and students may want and what schools and school boards feel pressured to teach because of testing requirements. Parents want computer science education Two-thirds of students, educators and parents surveyed in a 2014 poll by Google and Gallup believe that opportunities to learn computer science are just as important as required courses such as math, science, history and English. But parents, in particular, were significantly more likely than administrators to believe computer science was more important than core subjects and electives such as art, music and ...

Posted Sept. 2, 2015, 8 a.m. by Nicolaus Jannasch | View Comments
asking for allowance

“Mom, Dad … I need an allowance.” These are some of the hardest words to say if you are a high-school student looking at a parent across the table. Why? Because you know what comes next. You’ll soon be getting questions about your grades, how much time you hang out with friends, how late your curfew is, and what you did with that $30 they gave you last week. It’s a tough seat to be in, and I understand. Here’s a few ways you can help yourself when it comes to this conversation. 1. Take on volunteer work. Couldn’t you ...

Posted Sept. 1, 2015, 8 a.m. by Casey Hoke | View Comments
support LGBT

In eighth grade, my history teacher told the class that he believed gay and transgender people could not lead productive and successful lives in the "real world" due to such "alternative lifestyles,” and that they would all end up in hell. (There was much gasping from the naive middle school class.) This was after I placed a notecard on my desk about supporting LGBT+ people on The Gay, Lesbian, Straight Education Network’s (GLSEN) annual "Day of Silence" to combat bullying and the silence that LGBT+ youth face and express when bullied. That teacher’s words played a huge part in hindering ...

Posted Aug. 31, 2015, 9 a.m. by Nicolaus Jannasch | View Comments
common mistakes you make as a freshman in college

It is your first year of high school, which means, the first step towards college. High school is an exciting and important time for self-growth and experiencing new things. It is also a time to put the right things into priority. As early as it may seem, the road to college really starts your first year of high school. Though right now, your first priority as a high school freshman may not always be about college, it is important to avoid some common mistakes that freshmen make in order to head towards the right direction for your future. Your time ...

Posted Aug. 28, 2015, 8 a.m. by Nicolaus Jannasch | View Comments
high school and college relationships

I know from experience that the transition from high school to college can be a challenge for relationships. If one of you is going out of state for college, staying in contact and remaining close will be especially difficult. My girlfriend and I went to high school together in California. I applied to colleges all around the country, and eventually selected Northeastern University in Boston. We dated long-distance for a few months, but we eventually decided to end the relationship. Deciding to go into a long-distance relationship was a big decision for both of us. It changed my entire experience ...

Posted Aug. 27, 2015, 8 a.m. by Alicia Blaisdell-Bannon | View Comments
tips from a college professor

When I was a college freshman at Syracuse University, I got two good tips from my favorite professor: First, bring a pen to class. Second, make sure your parents take you to Danziger’s Restaurant for roast beef sandwiches when they visit. Good advice, of course, but, as an adjunct professor for several colleges in and around Boston, I believe I can do better. Here are seven things students should know as they begin their college careers. And for those of you not quite there yet, these tips, according to my daughter, a high school teacher, are applicable for you, too. ...

Posted Aug. 26, 2015, 9 a.m. by Nicolaus Jannasch | View Comments
teacher college recommendations

When submitting a college application, one of the most important components is the recommendation letter from one of your teachers. The reason being is that colleges want to get to know you for more than just statistics and grades. A solid recommendation letter can show college admissions what sort of candidate you are and if you are the right fit for them. The most common mistake seniors make in asking a teacher for a recommendation letter however, is that they don’t have a real personal relationship with that teacher. This could lead to the teacher writing a very generic letter ...

Posted Aug. 25, 2015, 8 a.m. by John Bergin | View Comments
make a big campus feel small

I go to a big school. No, really. With an average undergraduate population of 40,000, I go to a BIG school. That sort of number can sometimes frighten people and make them think like this: “How will I make any close friends when there are so many people?” “Will I lose myself in a sea of faces?” “Do any of my social choices have any true bearing or will they be forgotten like the hundreds of other people who’ve made those same choices in the past?” So let me provide you with a short list for how to make a ...

Posted Aug. 24, 2015, 8 a.m. by Tracy Jackson, PhD | View Comments
what to expect in high school

“I can’t believe my child is going to high school!” said a close friend of mine. That sentiment is true for hundreds of thousands of parents across the country right now. As school districts prepare for the beginning of the school year, here are some things to remember about how high school will be different than eighth grade. 1. Courses with upper classmen While core subjects (English, science, social studies and math) usually are filled with the same grade level of students, there may be an occasional upper classman. These students either failed and must repeat the class, or perhaps ...

Posted Aug. 21, 2015, 8 a.m. by Suzanne Shaffer | View Comments
10 Ways to Ruin Your College Admissions Chances

College. It’s not a done deal until it’s a done deal. It’s a tough road and one that can be finalized with offers of admission or rejection letters. It’s not a task to be taken lightly and it will require all your hard work and stamina at the beginning of your senior year. If done right and taken seriously, your hopes will be realized. But, committing the following fatal errors, could dash any offers of admission: 1. Spout Off on Social Media In an article in the NY Times, a student attended an information session with a college and began ...

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