Overview

Lindner Center of HOPE's Adolescent Comprehensive Diagnostic and Treatment Program, named Williams House, offers a specialized and intimate treatment setting, focusing on intensive assessment and treatment of patients, age 11 through 17, suffering with complex, co-morbid mental health issues.

Williams House:  Adolescent Comprehensive Diagnostic and Treatment Program at Lindner Center of HOPE

Adolescence is a critical time when physical, cognitive, and social changes allow a teenager to develop the identity that will serve as a basis for their adult lives. Unfortunately, research indicates this is also the time when psychiatric illness develops and becomes more present. The significant impact of these illnesses in the developmental years, makes finding the right care environment even more critical.

Struggles with mental health and addiction issues can be complex and complicated, so much so that typical inpatient and outpatient assessment and treatment options may not be able to get to the root of the issues.

The Adolescent Comprehensive Diagnostic Assessment and Intensive Treatment Program, named Williams House, offers a specialized and intimate treatment setting within the Lindner Center of HOPE, focusing on intensive assessment and treatment of patients, age 11 through 17, suffering with complex, co-morbid mental health issues. As adolescence is such a tender time, accurate diagnosis, effective treatment planning, and the development of a solid blueprint for treatment success and realistic future focus is even more crucial. A 21-day diagnostic stay for adolescents results in a detailed but concise diagnostic picture, which includes the results of genetic testing for the development of the optimal psychopharmacologic treatment plan. Additional treatment weeks, beyond the diagnostic assessment, feature a strengths-based approach to treatment helping adolescents build skills readying them for next steps in treatment and life.

Serving patients ages 11 to 17 with:Depression & Bipolar DisordersAnxiety & Obsessive Compulsive DisordersDisorders of Thinking & Related ConditionsComplex, Co-morbidityEating DisordersAddictive and Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorders Williams House, a private pay program, features:A quick and smooth referral and intake process.A safe and welcoming environment that meets the adolescent where they are.A highly credentialed treatment team, with access to 45 clinical consultants.Specialization in complex mental health and addictive disorders.An evidence-based compilation of psychological and neuropsychological testing.A comprehensive assessment resulting in a detailed but concise diagnostic picture.Genetic testing for developing the optimal psychopharmacologic treatment plan.A structured milieu model with CBT and DBT as a foundation.A strengths-based approach to treatment recommendations and development of future focus.A licensed teacher collaboratively working with the treatment team and home school contacts.Parent and family involvement and education.Follow-up support for up to 3 months after discharge. A network of HOPE for further treatment referrals for patients and families.

Participant Reviews

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Testimonials

One Families Journey to Healing Patient Background – Getting to know Luke* *Patient’s name changed for confidentiality Luke* epitomized what an outstanding 17-year-old would be like. Even so young, he seemed to have it all together. His grades were tops in the state of Connecticut, he was beloved by friends and family, and he was considered an all-around “good kid” by everyone who encountered him. Aside from headaches that plagued him for the last year and a half, things seemed as close to perfect as they could be for this 17-year-old, preparing to enter his senior year of high school. However, in early Spring he began complaining about nausea that persisted for several months. Unable to uncover a diagnosis, Luke’s mom, Gretchen, and dad, Robert, took him to specialists outside of New England. During this trip, some of Luke’s behaviors began to seem unusual to Gretchen and Robert. Meanwhile, the specialists suggested that the cause of Luke’s nausea was anxiety; and recommended Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. Luke’s behaviors continued to be bizarre into the summer. The family was on vacation and Luke started a fight with his dad, which resulted in police being called and Luke in handcuffs. Luke was completely out of character. After conversations with the doctors, Gretchen and Robert decided to have Luke discontinue taking medication he was prescribed for his headaches, in order to eliminate concerns about negative side effects. Mood swings and paranoid behaviors became more consistent and landed Luke in the emergency room two more times and in two different psychiatric facilities. Gretchen and Robert knew they needed someone to help them sort through this. It was clear that they needed an accurate diagnostic picture and a treatment plan with recommendations that would guide them in their next steps. Having some professional connections in the mental health field, they received several recommendations that Lindner Center of HOPE’s Adolescent Diagnostic and Treatment Program, called Williams House, could help. Even during the admission process, Gretchen and Robert said they could feel a deeper level of support. On July 18, Luke was admitted to Williams House. Dr. Nicole Gibler, psychiatrist, staffed Luke’s case. Collaboration with the right program “Luke came to us after what appeared to be a reaction to medications and a manic episode after a physical workup. His parents were seeking a clear diagnosis. Luke’s symptoms were diagnostically complex, but seemed to point to sudden onset, rapid cycling bipolar disorder. His response was so bizarre we had three other psychiatrists consult on the case, including Drs. Paul Keck and Susan McElroy, world renowned bipolar researchers, in order to find a successful medication regimen. A physical therapist from the University of Cincinnati was also engaged, as Luke expressed a need for a physical outlet,” said Dr. Gibler. “Our collaborative nature and the unit’s adaptability enabled us to accommodate Luke’s complex needs. The milieu staff were very in-tune with him.” According to Gretchen and Robert, “Luke’s case was thought through carefully and lovingly and every effort was made to do what was best for him. We feel it was a great blessing to start at Lindner. We feel like we have had a good working partnership with Lindner and we let the professionals do the work, receiving good communication throughout.” Time to heal Luke discharged from Williams House with a medication regimen, and supports in place, including an educational consultant who will continue to provide guidance to Gretchen and Robert as they follow treatment recommendations for Luke. Gretchen and Robert understand, “This is a marathon. The staff worked with Luke to help him reframe how his senior year of high school might look. He came to understand that it is okay to give himself time to heal. This is foundational as we move ahead.”

- Anonymous - Sept. 1, 2014

Participant Reviews

Write a Review

This program hasn't been reviewed yet. Write the first review!

Testimonials

One Families Journey to Healing Patient Background – Getting to know Luke* *Patient’s name changed for confidentiality Luke* epitomized what an outstanding 17-year-old would be like. Even so young, he seemed to have it all together. His grades were tops in the state of Connecticut, he was beloved by friends and family, and he was considered an all-around “good kid” by everyone who encountered him. Aside from headaches that plagued him for the last year and a half, things seemed as close to perfect as they could be for this 17-year-old, preparing to enter his senior year of high school. However, in early Spring he began complaining about nausea that persisted for several months. Unable to uncover a diagnosis, Luke’s mom, Gretchen, and dad, Robert, took him to specialists outside of New England. During this trip, some of Luke’s behaviors began to seem unusual to Gretchen and Robert. Meanwhile, the specialists suggested that the cause of Luke’s nausea was anxiety; and recommended Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. Luke’s behaviors continued to be bizarre into the summer. The family was on vacation and Luke started a fight with his dad, which resulted in police being called and Luke in handcuffs. Luke was completely out of character. After conversations with the doctors, Gretchen and Robert decided to have Luke discontinue taking medication he was prescribed for his headaches, in order to eliminate concerns about negative side effects. Mood swings and paranoid behaviors became more consistent and landed Luke in the emergency room two more times and in two different psychiatric facilities. Gretchen and Robert knew they needed someone to help them sort through this. It was clear that they needed an accurate diagnostic picture and a treatment plan with recommendations that would guide them in their next steps. Having some professional connections in the mental health field, they received several recommendations that Lindner Center of HOPE’s Adolescent Diagnostic and Treatment Program, called Williams House, could help. Even during the admission process, Gretchen and Robert said they could feel a deeper level of support. On July 18, Luke was admitted to Williams House. Dr. Nicole Gibler, psychiatrist, staffed Luke’s case. Collaboration with the right program “Luke came to us after what appeared to be a reaction to medications and a manic episode after a physical workup. His parents were seeking a clear diagnosis. Luke’s symptoms were diagnostically complex, but seemed to point to sudden onset, rapid cycling bipolar disorder. His response was so bizarre we had three other psychiatrists consult on the case, including Drs. Paul Keck and Susan McElroy, world renowned bipolar researchers, in order to find a successful medication regimen. A physical therapist from the University of Cincinnati was also engaged, as Luke expressed a need for a physical outlet,” said Dr. Gibler. “Our collaborative nature and the unit’s adaptability enabled us to accommodate Luke’s complex needs. The milieu staff were very in-tune with him.” According to Gretchen and Robert, “Luke’s case was thought through carefully and lovingly and every effort was made to do what was best for him. We feel it was a great blessing to start at Lindner. We feel like we have had a good working partnership with Lindner and we let the professionals do the work, receiving good communication throughout.” Time to heal Luke discharged from Williams House with a medication regimen, and supports in place, including an educational consultant who will continue to provide guidance to Gretchen and Robert as they follow treatment recommendations for Luke. Gretchen and Robert understand, “This is a marathon. The staff worked with Luke to help him reframe how his senior year of high school might look. He came to understand that it is okay to give himself time to heal. This is foundational as we move ahead.”

- Anonymous - Sept. 1, 2014

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