TeenLife Blog

Supporting teen success, one post at a time

Category: TeenLife News

Posted Oct. 12, 2015, 8 a.m. by John Cho | View Comments
4 tips for writing a research paper

In 10th grade, I took AP World History and had to write my very first major research paper. I was overwhelmed and stressed out of my mind. How would I possibly get the required 15 sources about Fidel Castro’s early political philosophy? I soon found out, however, that the research process is actually quite straightforward if you have a process. 1) Pick a great topic This seems like a moot point, but it’s really not. Picking an appropriate topic is essential: not too broad, not too narrow. If you decide to research an overly narrow topic such as, “The significance ...

Posted Oct. 6, 2015, 8 a.m. by The Experts at TeenLife | View Comments
science scholarship dosomething.org

Use your phone and your Sherlock Holmes sleuthing skills to solve a mystery, enter a contest for a $10,000 scholarship, and help a classroom spread the message of STEM. Why’s everyone so worried about science, technology, engineering, and math? For starters, STEM occupations are projected to grow by 17 percent from 2008 to 2018, compared to 9.8 percent growth for non-STEM, according to the U.S. government. But it turns out gender has lot to do with who might be filling those jobs. When the National Science Foundation asked fourth-graders in 2007 if they liked science and math, 68 percent of ...

Posted Oct. 5, 2015, 8 a.m. by Zachary Bernstein | View Comments
Leadership Lessons from New York Jets

If you’re in high school, you never know where the most valuable lessons will come from. I launched the High School Leadership Academy to give New York metro area students practical leadership training by connecting them with officials and executives in a variety of industries. Our first meeting was with six top executives from the New York Jets, including the football team’s president, Neil Glat. Here are six pieces of advice we gained from the Jets executives about leadership: A lot of “A” students fail to succeed because they don’t know how to be effective when dealing with people. By ...

Posted Oct. 2, 2015, 8 a.m. by Suzanne Shaffer | View Comments
Cutting College Costs

When you think about college costs, you automatically think about tuition, room, and board. But once you’ve paid the college for these expenses, there are countless other expenses that can add up and increase your college costs. Want to save money and lower your costs? Try these 10 tips: 1. Get the smaller meal plan Colleges automatically include a three-meal plan when figuring your college costs. But the reality is that most students rarely eat three meals a day. You can save a good amount of money by decreasing the plan to two meals. When my daughter went to college ...

Posted Sept. 28, 2015, 8 a.m. by Lindsey Stahley | View Comments
community service

Admissions officers are looking more and more closely at extracurricular activities and leadership skills when evaluating college applicants. So, high school community service can be critical. But before you start accumulating hours for all sorts of miscellaneous things, know that college admissions staff are not just looking for a high number of hours. Community service needs to be the right kind of work and you need to be doing it for the right reasons. Colleges put a premium on teen community service. They also like students who approach this work with passion and authenticity. Basically, this means a college wants ...

Posted Sept. 25, 2015, 8 a.m. by Suzanne Shaffer | View Comments
scholarship search

For college-bound students, scholarships can fill in the gap between what you can afford and the cost of the school. Most students believe scholarships are a pipe dream if they aren’t athletes or 4.0 students. But nothing could be further from the truth. There are thousands of scholarships available for the taking. You just need to find them. There are six key places to look. But remember: Finding them is half the battle. You have to put in the effort to apply and be vigilant in paying attention to requirements and deadlines. 1. Search Locally Beat the scholarship odds by ...

Posted Sept. 23, 2015, 8 a.m. by The Experts at TeenLife | View Comments
Royal Central School of Speech and Drama

It’s the land of Shakespeare, Shaw, Pinter, and, most recently, Agbaje. Why wouldn’t someone interested in the stage want to study in London? We asked the experts at Royal Central School of Speech and Drama why American students might pass on New York or Los Angeles to head across the pond. Central has 17 different full-time undergraduate courses covering not just acting but every aspect of technical theater, theater education and writing for performance. It accepts students from all backgrounds and nationalities and actors train in a community that mimics what they will experience in the industry. (Pinter, by the ...

Posted Sept. 16, 2015, 8 a.m. by John Bergin | View Comments
when your passion isn't your career

I have realized that my artistic passion will not be my career. And I’m OK with that. Let me start with two points, for anyone who reads this and thinks, “Well, I guess all those years of lessons / classes / workshops / masterclasses / ensembles are a total waste because this (hopefully) relatable 21-year-old tells me they are in his eloquently worded article.” First, if that’s what you take away from this, you’re not reading this correctly. No part of this article is meant to attack the pursuit of an artistic passion as a career. I envy that pursuit, ...

Posted Sept. 15, 2015, 8 a.m. by John Cho | View Comments
AP US History Exam

Last year, College Board rolled out its new Advanced Placement U.S. History exam. This move prompted a wave of criticism from teachers all around the country. Many complained that the new AP history curriculum focused too heavily on “alternative narratives” instead of telling the true (a k a old white male) story of our proud nation. I won't say a lot here other than that view sounds a bit too much like Arizona (no, not the tea). Others, however, offered a more legitimate critique: College Board simply wasn't providing enough resources for students to succeed on this new exam. Teachers, ...

Posted Sept. 1, 2015, 8 a.m. by Casey Hoke | View Comments
support LGBT

In eighth grade, my history teacher told the class that he believed gay and transgender people could not lead productive and successful lives in the "real world" due to such "alternative lifestyles,” and that they would all end up in hell. (There was much gasping from the naive middle school class.) This was after I placed a notecard on my desk about supporting LGBT+ people on The Gay, Lesbian, Straight Education Network’s (GLSEN) annual "Day of Silence" to combat bullying and the silence that LGBT+ youth face and express when bullied. That teacher’s words played a huge part in hindering ...

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