TeenLife Blog

Supporting teen success, one post at a time

Category: College Admissions

Posted March 21, 2014, 2 p.m. by Andrew Belasco | View Comments
tips for aspiring lawyers

So you want to be a lawyer? Welcome to installment one of College Transitions’ "So you want to be a..." series. Designed to help career-minded high school students think intelligently about their postsecondary journeys, these blogs will look at the financial, academic, and personal factors one should consider when exploring various academic pathways and professions. Does going to a prestigious undergraduate school help? Getting into a top law school is first and foremost a numbers game. Simply put, a high GPA and sparkling LSAT score are your ticket to the country’s top law schools. So with that in mind, does ...

Posted March 19, 2014, 11 a.m. by Andrew Belasco | View Comments
Does Being a College "Legacy" Matter?

In the past several years, higher education researchers have yielded some interesting findings on the advantage held by so-called "legacy" applicants who have familial ties to a given school. If you happen to be interested in attending your parent’s alma mater, you will likely find their work highly encouraging. If not, it’s still important to be aware as you enter the admissions process that not every decision to accept or reject is driven by merit. A few key facts that may surprise you: 1. Applicants to highly selective colleges experience a 45 percentage-point increase in their probability of admission, on ...

Posted March 18, 2014, 4:27 p.m. by Stephen Friedfeld | View Comments
Young woman looking confused at post-it notes on a glass wall.

The college application essay – what should you write about? More importantly, what should you not write about? Did you just break up with someone you were dating? Colleges don’t want to know about it. Are you a waiter who spit in a rude customer’s food? There’s no need to tell colleges about that either. Is George Washington the greatest president in your opinion? Please don’t choose this topic. Take a look at the examples above. Why are these potentially bad topics? There’s a risk when you talk about boyfriends and girlfriends in your college essay. Are admissions officers really ...

Posted March 13, 2014, 9 a.m. by Randi Mazzella | View Comments
Scholarships Can Add Up to Big College Savings

With college costs at an all-time high and continuing to rise, it makes sense for high school students to apply for as many scholarships as possible. “Applying for scholarships may seem like a daunting process to students, especially for those already busy getting applications together for college. But for students willing to put in the time and effort, there are many scholarship dollars available," explains April Bell, director at the College Board. Is Your Student Eligible for a Scholarship? College scholarships can be broadly divided into two categories: Financial need-based and merit-based. Many families assume that to receive a merit-based ...

Posted March 11, 2014, 11 a.m. by Suzanne Shaffer | View Comments
Should Parents Pay for College?

The news this past week was inundated with stories about a young teen from New Jersey who sued her parents to pay for college. Parents all over the country have weighed in. A recent poll conducted by NJ.com asked parents if they agreed with the lawsuit. The poll results were not surprising: 5% said parents should be required to pay; 95% said they should not. With college costs rising, and more and more parents trying to find a way to pay for college, many parents are asking if they should pay, and if so, how much? Whether you can afford ...

Posted March 6, 2014, 12:57 p.m. by Customer Service | View Comments
The New SAT

The college application process is about to see some dramatic changes. The New SAT This week, the College Board announced plans to refocus and realign the SAT—a test loathed and feared by so many high school students. Possibly as a result of a study released by the National Association for College Admissions Counseling, which proved that strong grades are a better indicator of academic performance than test scores, the College Board will make the SAT more focused around the high school curriculum. The New York Times article published this month, “A New SAT Aims to Realign With Schoolwork,” explains the ...

Posted Jan. 17, 2014, 12:01 p.m. by Elizabeth Suneby | View Comments
Public Vs. Private High School: One Family's Perspective

My son recently graduated from a high-quality private high school and my daughter is in 12th grade at a high-quality public one. My son prospered at private school, while my daughter would not change her educational experience at public school. I have an inside view of both worlds. Rather than provide my perspective on the pros and cons of each educational option, I am sharing the astute insights my daughter offered when she lobbied to stay in public school. Here’s a recap of our conversation with my points and her counterpoints: Just think, in private school you’ll get: Intellectual and ...

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