TeenLife Blog

Supporting teen success, one post at a time

Category: College Admissions

Posted July 16, 2019, 10:55 a.m. by Venkates Swaminathan | View Comments
Adversity testing score

Understanding how the new Environmental Context Dashboard impacts your college application. In mid-May, the Wall Street Journal broke the story that the College Board “plans to assign an adversity score to every student who takes the SAT.” The new score has been widely discussed in the college admissions community, and could change the admissions process significantly over time, but the immediate question for many parents and students is this: How does it affect my teen and their application to college? The term “adversity score” is a misnomer for what the College Board calls an Environmental College Dashboard. Over the past ...

Posted July 9, 2019, 10 a.m. by Moira McCullough | View Comments
College Tour

When researching colleges, every interaction with a potential school plays a role in the decision whether to apply. Everything from the drive up to campus to the interaction with a tour guide to an Instagram post you scroll past right before you fall asleep is evidence you can use to decide whether a school is a good fit for you. Choosing to apply to a specific university is more than making a pro/con list and confirming they have your major—it is a visceral feeling that this place could become a home. College admissions is about crafting the most compelling and ...

Posted July 5, 2019, 10 a.m. by Sarah Good | View Comments
Paying for College

It can be fun to daydream about college: the ivy-draped campus, making new friends in the dorm, long intellectual discussions with like-minded classmates. Thinking about paying for it all, however, is far less fun. For the 2018-19 school year, the average cost for an in-state student at a four-year public college was $9,716, according to U.S. News & World Report. Want to attend a private school? The average price tag skyrockets to more than $35,600. And the numbers keep inching up every year. So what are educationally ambitious students — and their parents — to do? Fear not: You have ...

Posted June 28, 2019, 10:44 a.m. by Cara Imperato | View Comments
Employment

Want the perfect job offer before you’ve even crossed the stage at graduation? That’s every student’s dream — and it’s possible. These majors will prepare you for well-paying careers with steady growth or constant demand. Let’s take a look at each one – and the doors they’ll open for you. Nursing Nursing puts you on the front lines of health care. You should be comfortable with the sciences since you’ll take courses like anatomy, chemistry, microbiology, and nutrition. Your major will also include hands-on experience through supervised clinical internships. After you pass a national exam, you’ll be ready to practice ...

Posted June 25, 2019, 10:54 a.m. by Sarah Good | View Comments
Social media

You Snapchat and you Instagram, and sometimes you tweet. Occasionally you even spend a few minutes on Facebook catching up with your aunts and uncles. Social media is a fact of contemporary life, just another way to keep the conversation going with your friends and classmates. Sometimes, though, this comfort with free-flowing digital dialogue can have a pretty severe downside. Earlier this month, Kyle Kashuv, a survivor of the Parkland shooting, reported on Twitter that his admission to Havard was rescinded when racist texts he had sent in the past surfaced. And two years ago, 10 students lost their chance ...

Posted June 15, 2019, 1 p.m. by Suzanne Shaffer | View Comments
10 Summer Activities That Will Turn Admissions’ Heads

In today’s competitive college admissions market, students are faced with the task of setting themselves apart from other applicants. Colleges look for students who are dedicated to academics but they want to build a well-rounded incoming freshman class. Admission officers look for those who demonstrate interesting and diverse qualities, not just those who spend 100 percent of their time studying. Colleges need and want students who are committed to activities that they are passionate about. The summer creates opportunities for students to demonstrate this quality, whether it's in a structured summer program for teenagers, or individually. The last thing you ...

Posted June 3, 2019, 4:33 p.m. by Stephen Friedfeld | View Comments
7 Tips on Getting Letters of Recommendation for College

If you’re a rising senior, it is extremely important to make getting letters of recommendation a top priority. How many will you need? Whom should you ask and when? What should they say about you? Typically, most large public institutions don’t require any letters. Admissions decisions are based on students’ grades, standardized test scores, essays, and extracurricular activities. But for most private colleges and universities, you’ll likely need one to three. The more selective the college, the more letters you’ll need. 7 Tips for Getting Letters of Recommendation: 1. Your school (or guidance) counselor will write your primary letter of ...

Posted May 22, 2019, 10:51 a.m. by David Wachtel | View Comments
MePlusMore

Research supports the positive academic and social outcomes when a student is engaged in sports, volunteering, clubs, organizations, and work-related activities throughout primary, middle, and in particular during a student’s high school years. A student who is consistently involved develops better organizational and time-management skills, which correlate to better academic performance. Also impacting academic performance is a student’s engagement with their school or organization. By participating in one or more activities throughout high school, like marching band, track team, or student government, a student’s identity grows along with their connection and commitment to other individuals in the organization. Many organizations, ...

Posted May 7, 2019, 5:57 p.m. by Katrielle Soussana | View Comments
Taking the SAT

With hours and hours of drills and practice and repetition, preparing for the SAT can be grueling on top of an already-packed schedule. In the middle of high school, we’re supposed to prep for and successfully take the SAT in order to get a result — a number — that tells colleges whether we are prepared for the academic rigor of university. But, like me, many students may have wondered if it can really measure our readiness for college. Is it actually an outdated system that’s used to generalize students into a rank when intelligence and readiness looks different from ...

Posted April 19, 2019, 3:42 p.m. by Sarah Good | View Comments
Essay Writing

You’ve studied the math, grappled with grammar, and worked on your reading comprehension. But then there’s the essay, looming over all your test prep, so uncertain and subjective. So what do you need to know about the essay? And how much does it even matter? We’re here to help. What you should know about the SAT essay 50 minutes to complete Your mission: Read a nonfiction, persuasive passage and write an essay analyzing the strategies and techniques the author uses to build an argument. Think structural elements, reasoning, data, and emotional word choice. How you’re scored: You will receive three ...

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