TeenLife Blog

Supporting teen success, one post at a time

Category: College Admissions

Posted June 25, 2019, 10:54 a.m. by Sarah Good | View Comments
Social media

You Snapchat and you Instagram, and sometimes you tweet. Occasionally you even spend a few minutes on Facebook catching up with your aunts and uncles. Social media is a fact of contemporary life, just another way to keep the conversation going with your friends and classmates. Sometimes, though, this comfort with free-flowing digital dialogue can have a pretty severe downside. Earlier this month, Kyle Kashuv, a survivor of the Parkland shooting, reported on Twitter that his admission to Havard was rescinded when racist texts he had sent in the past surfaced. And two years ago, 10 students lost their chance ...

Posted June 15, 2019, 1 p.m. by Suzanne Shaffer | View Comments
10 Summer Activities That Will Turn Admissions’ Heads

In today’s competitive college admissions market, students are faced with the task of setting themselves apart from other applicants. Colleges look for students who are dedicated to academics but they want to build a well-rounded incoming freshman class. Admission officers look for those who demonstrate interesting and diverse qualities, not just those who spend 100 percent of their time studying. Colleges need and want students who are committed to activities that they are passionate about. The summer creates opportunities for students to demonstrate this quality, whether it's in a structured summer program for teenagers, or individually. The last thing you ...

Posted June 3, 2019, 4:33 p.m. by Stephen Friedfeld | View Comments
7 Tips on Getting Letters of Recommendation for College

If you’re a rising senior, it is extremely important to make getting letters of recommendation a top priority. How many will you need? Whom should you ask and when? What should they say about you? Typically, most large public institutions don’t require any letters. Admissions decisions are based on students’ grades, standardized test scores, essays, and extracurricular activities. But for most private colleges and universities, you’ll likely need one to three. The more selective the college, the more letters you’ll need. 7 Tips for Getting Letters of Recommendation: 1. Your school (or guidance) counselor will write your primary letter of ...

Posted May 22, 2019, 10:51 a.m. by David Wachtel | View Comments
MePlusMore

Research supports the positive academic and social outcomes when a student is engaged in sports, volunteering, clubs, organizations, and work-related activities throughout primary, middle, and in particular during a student’s high school years. A student who is consistently involved develops better organizational and time-management skills, which correlate to better academic performance. Also impacting academic performance is a student’s engagement with their school or organization. By participating in one or more activities throughout high school, like marching band, track team, or student government, a student’s identity grows along with their connection and commitment to other individuals in the organization. Many organizations, ...

Posted May 7, 2019, 5:57 p.m. by Katrielle Soussana | View Comments
Taking the SAT

With hours and hours of drills and practice and repetition, preparing for the SAT can be grueling on top of an already-packed schedule. In the middle of high school, we’re supposed to prep for and successfully take the SAT in order to get a result — a number — that tells colleges whether we are prepared for the academic rigor of university. But, like me, many students may have wondered if it can really measure our readiness for college. Is it actually an outdated system that’s used to generalize students into a rank when intelligence and readiness looks different from ...

Posted April 19, 2019, 3:42 p.m. by Sarah Good | View Comments
Essay Writing

You’ve studied the math, grappled with grammar, and worked on your reading comprehension. But then there’s the essay, looming over all your test prep, so uncertain and subjective. So what do you need to know about the essay? And how much does it even matter? We’re here to help. What you should know about the SAT essay 50 minutes to complete Your mission: Read a nonfiction, persuasive passage and write an essay analyzing the strategies and techniques the author uses to build an argument. Think structural elements, reasoning, data, and emotional word choice. How you’re scored: You will receive three ...

Posted April 5, 2019, 8 a.m. by Karin Klein | View Comments
Data Choosing College

It’s a bewildering place, the world of college admissions. Students don’t know where to apply, or they pin their hopes on one or two “reach” schools that stand a good chance of letting them down. Whether it’s a yearning for a big-name university or a search for the school that will be “the right fit,” the decisions of which colleges to apply to and attend feel like the lynchpin that will determine whether these students are headed toward a happy future or a miserable life. This phase of life would be far simpler and more relaxed if applicants and their ...

Posted March 25, 2019, 8 a.m. by Suzanne Shaffer | View Comments
Considering second-choice school

The college admissions offers have all arrived but, sadly, your student’s dream school was a no. Or perhaps, the first-choice school came through, but the financial aid didn’t. It looks like it’s time to re-evaluate the colleges lower down on their application list. Of course, deciding to attend a college that wasn’t a top choice might initially seem like letdown. However, with the right mindset you can transform this disappointment into a higher education triumph. Reconsidering Second-choice Schools As you begin to reconsider your options, remind yourself of these five realities to keep positive and maximize your chances of finding ...

Posted March 7, 2019, 8 a.m. by Katrielle Soussana | View Comments
Young blonde woman studying at computer.

The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme is an international education system that in the United States spans the last two years of secondary education – junior and senior year. There are many components to the IBDP curriculum, but in this post, I want to provide a balanced look into the life of an IBDP student in high school and hopefully help any readers decide if it’s the right path for them. But before I do this, I want to explain a little about the circumstances behind my IB education. My high school is a new IB World School and I am ...

Posted March 5, 2019, 8 a.m. by Suzanne Shaffer | View Comments
pencil and SAT answer sheet

What is a “test-optional” college? It is a college and/or university that de-emphasizes the use of standardized tests and picks a substantial number of applicants who are recent graduate U.S. high schools without using the SAT or ACT. Other colleges exempt students who meet grade-point average or class rank criteria from submitting ACT or SAT scores, while others require scores but claim to use them only for placement purposes or to conduct research studies. Test-optional colleges have long been a controversial topic. When a college allows students to opt out of reporting their standardized test scores, do they have an ...

< 1 2 3 4 5 ... 32 33 34 >