TeenLife Blog

Supporting teen success, one post at a time

Author: Jill Tipograph

A professional summer planner, youth expert, and parent consultant for nearly 20 years, Jill Tipograph has researched over two-thousand camps and programs, helping families worldwide plan the “right” summer. Her unique Everything Summer® evaluation process is focused on safety, well-being, family values, and “personality fit” between kids and camps.

Posted April 9, 2014, 3:13 p.m. by Jill Tipograph | View Comments
Community Service and Summer: Steps to College

The simple fact is that colleges want good citizens. That's why high school community service is an important factor for college admissions. And there are places where teenage volunteers can make a difference, in their own towns and around the world. // Summer Service Programs Many summer community service programs for teens are based in impoverished or rural areas in the United States or Third World countries. They vary in size but usually include 12 to 25 students. Service in these sorts of programs typically involves different projects: physical work (construction of schools, clean up, restoration); teaching; working with underserved ...

Posted April 6, 2014, 11 a.m. by Jill Tipograph | View Comments
Documenting (And Maximizing) Your Summer Experience

Your teen has returned from his/her summer experience full of stories, ideas and new resolve to take on more challenges...Now what? After catching up on sleep, the very next thing that he/she should do is to compose a personal essay about the experience while it is fresh in his/her mind. The write-up may prove useful when constructing college essays further down the road. Ideally, the essay should be about one piece of the experience, one moment where your teen felt that something mattered, or their perspective changed. If your teenager is up for it, have them write more than one ...

Posted Jan. 17, 2014, 11:10 a.m. by Jill Tipograph | View Comments
5 Things to Consider When Your Teen Travels Over The Summer

You’ve enrolled your teen in their summer program. Check it off your list. While your teen may think he/she is ready to conquer the world with independence, parents often know best. Help them prepare and transition to their away-from-home program with these tips: 1. Review with your teen the program’s guidelines, requirements, and restrictions. This includes electronics, laptops, cell phone policies, clothing, amount of permissible luggage (remember he/she has to transport it!). Your teen needs to respect these rules as well as the program’s staff. As most smart phones have cameras, some programs do not allow these devices. Look into ...