TeenLife Blog Supporting teen success, one post at a time

The 6 Best Topics For Your College Application Essay

Posted by | View Comments

The 6 Best Topics For Your College Application Essay

With college admissions as competitive as it is today, the application essay can mean the difference between an acceptance or rejection letter.

Admissions officers are increasingly turning to the essay as a means of evaluating students. Many applicants fail to take advantage of the essay—they choose the wrong question, write about an inappropriate topic, or just fail to put together a compelling essay.

So, what should applicants write about? Here, we breakdown the six questions from this year’s Common Application, an online application accepted by more than 450 colleges and universities. (Even colleges that don’t accept the Common App tend to have essay prompts that are the same or similar.)

1. Evaluate a significant experience, achievement, risk, or ethical dilemma and its impact on you.

Consider any experience or achievement that is significant to you—it can be big or small. Perhaps you found working with children rewarding because you want to be a teacher someday, or perhaps you created your own workout regimen to get fit. Make sure not to dwell on the experience—instead, talk about how you or your outlook changed because of it. Fewer students will talk about a risk they’ve taken, but remember: It doesn’t have to be bungee jumping! It can be saying no to peer pressure and risking your friendships. If you choose to write about an ethical dilemma, use caution—you don’t want admissions officers questioning your moral integrity.

2. Discuss some issue of personal, local, national, or international concern and its importance to you.

Here’s a chance to give more context about you. If the matter is personal, that’s easy to do. But if it’s a national or international issue, then it’s tempting to talk about the environment or the war-torn Middle East, for example. But do we learn about you? Make sure the issue ties into your personal experiences and interests.

3. Indicate a person who has had a significant influence on you, and describe that influence.

Don’t tell admissions officers too much about your “influential person.” Instead, talk a little bit about the person, but mostly about how you have changed or reacted because of that person. Maybe you found an academic passion or hobby because of favorite teacher or coach; maybe you changed how you treat others because of the character of a family member or close friend.

4. Describe a character in fiction, a historical figure, or a creative work that has had an influence on you, and explain why.

This is a hard question for most students to answer—again, you don’t want to talk too much about that character, historical figure, or creative work, but instead, describe their influence on you. Perhaps a building’s unique design influenced your desire to study architecture. Maybe a lead character’s actions in a movie or novel oddly paralleled your own actions. Note: If you’re going to write about a fictional character, avoid very common novels that most students read in high school, and instead use a novel that you read independently—it’ll help you stand out.

5. Describe an experience that illustrates what you would bring to the diversity in a college community or an encounter that demonstrated the importance of diversity to you.

Consider diversity in many ways—your geography, academic interests, family background, religion, race, and ethnicity. How would you contribute to a college? Or what do you hope to learn from others who are different from you at that school?

6. Topic of your choice.

If you’re applying to a college that does not accept the Common App, you’ll have to answer their specific essay questions. However, keep in mind that you can simply use that essay for your other applications as well. If it is an open-ended promt, ask and then answer your own question—it’ll show off your creative side.

Colleges want to get to know more about you. Write clearly and show colleges how you think and what you will contribute to the campus. Ultimately, it doesn’t matter which question you choose—it’s what you do with the answer that matters most.

comments powered by Disqus

Stay Up to Date with Opportunities for Teens!

Join TeenLife today for hot-off-the-presses access to new experiential learning programs, advice on making the most of your life experiences, common-sense wisdom on teen parenting, and special offers limited to our members only.

Join TeenLife

TeenLife members are the first to learn of new developments in the world of teen enrichment, and receive special offers on products and services that are essential for teen success.

Already a member? Login here.

Login to TeenLife

Not a member yet? Join here.

Forgot password? Click here.

Welcome to the Family!

To help create a great TeenLife experience for you, we need to ask a couple more questions. Then, we’ll take you right back where you started.

Welcome to the Family!

To help create a great TeenLife experience for you, we need to ask a couple more questions. Then, we’ll take you right back where you started.

Enter the email address of your TeenLife account. An email will be sent containing instructions to reset your password.

Note: Only accounts registered on TeenLife.com can restore passwords. If you signed into TeenLife with Facebook or Google, you do not have a password to reset.